Managing Your Persistent Fears, Anxieties and Stresses

Written by Stan Popovich

Everybody deals with anxiety and depression, however some people have a difficult time in managing it. As a result, here is a brief list of techniques that a person can use to help manage their most persistent fears and every day anxieties.

When facing a current or upcoming task that overwhelms you with a lot of anxiety, the first thing you can do is to divide the task into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success.

Sometimes we get stressed out when everything happens all at once. When this happens, a person should take a deep breath and try to find something to do for a few minutes to get their mind off of the problem. A person could get some fresh air, listen to some music, or do an activity that will give them a fresh perspective on things.

A person should visualize a red stop sign in their mind when they encounter a fear provoking thought. When the negative thought comes, a person should think of a red stop sign that serves as a reminder to stop focusing on that thought and to think of something else. A person can then try to think of something positive to replace the negative thought.

Another technique that is very helpful is to have a small notebook of positive statements that makes you feel good. Whenever you come across an affirmation that makes you feel good, write it down in a small notebook that you can carry around with you in your pocket. Whenever you feel depressed or frustrated, open up your small notebook and read those statements. This will help to manage your negative thinking.

Learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. You never know when the answers you are looking for will come to your doorstep. We may be ninety-nine percent correct in predicting the future, but all it takes is for that one percent to make a world of difference.

Take advantage of the help that is available around you. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your depression and anxieties. They will be able to provide you with additional advice and insights on how to deal with your current problem. By talking to a professional, a person will be helping themselves in the long run because they will become better able to deal with their problems in the future. Remember that it never hurts to ask for help.

Dealing with our persistent fears is not easy. Remember that all you can do is to do your best each day, hope for the best, and take things in stride. Patience, persistence, education, and being committed in trying to solve your problem will go along way in fixing your problems.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Stan Popovich is a Penn State Graduate with a B.S. in Earth Science and Computers and Associates in Business Management. He is a layman who has struggled with anxiey and fear for over 15 years and the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. Stan wrote this book based on his experiences and his interviews with various professionals. For more information, visit his website at www.managingfear.com

Please do not substitute information found on this website for professional advice. Contact a local doctor or counselor for guidance.

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Comments

  1. Gary says

    Thank you for taking the time to write these. Are there some assumptions made before we get to the stage of considering/invoking some of these tips?

    I am wondering about things like the possibilitiy that, indeed you are faced with a task that is clearly unmanageable – no one could manage it. When things happen all at once, maybe you can be assertive and inform the sources of the things you are being given that they will have to wait…things will need to be prioritized because you already have things to do – first come first serve.

    Shall we assume that the possibilities i’ve suggested are not possible and that this is the ‘disorder’ causing the stress and not real stress form overload? I’m concerned that the article is much like my least favorite piece of advice – “just relax”…”calm down”…etc.

    I have lrarn that odten I simply need to push back.

    Thank you – Gary

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