IDA Makes Top 10 Blogs for 2014

IDA in “Top 10 Guest Blogs of 2014″ on Disability.gov

IDA Founder, Wayne Connell is a regular Guest Blogger on Disability.blog by Disability.gov. We are elated to announce that IDA made the “Top 10 Guest Blogs of 2014.”

We are thrilled to receive this recognition for the third year in a row! We are grateful to be given the opportunity to bring about more awareness and education about Invisible Disabilities! Read full story.

Thank you to all of our guest CO-authors and readers who have commented and liked our blogs, showing your support for what IDA is doing!

It’s Not a Laughing Matter

Matt Iseman Invisible Disabilities 2014 But You LOOK Good Inspiration AwardA diabetic, a blind man and an amputee walk into a bar. The bartender says, “What is this – some kind of joke?”

Having a disability is no joke according to IDA Advisory Board Member and Neurohumorist expert, Karyn Buxman, RN, MSN. “But it can be a laughing matter. Pain, suffering, isolation, stress, depression, financial hardships – the problems can seem never ending. And to survive you need all the possible tools in your tool belt that you can find. One tool that is frequently overlooked is humor.”

“Science is affirming what we’ve suspected all along – laughter is good medicine. The benefits for you are so numerous that you are not going to want to wait for humor to happen by chance. You’ll want to be proactive and experience humor by choice. And the good news is, you don’t have to be funny. You just have to see funny,” says Karyn. “My mission is to improve global health and business through laughter and help heal the humor impaired.”

[Read more…]

The Loneliness of Illness and Pain

Loneliness-Illness-Pain-Invisible-Disabilities-Association“You’re lucky you don’t have to work!” “You’re just giving up!” “You need to get out more!”

When we break a leg, are we better off hopping on it or using crutches? Right after having major surgery, would we recover better if we went hiking or if we rested a bit in the hospital? We all know the answer to those questions. Otherwise, there would be mountain slopes instead of gurneys outside of every operating room.

When dealing with a broken leg, it heals and the person returns to life as usual. On the other hand, for many living with ongoing illnesses, “as the illness progresses, [people] must adjust each day to the disease, sometimes severe, sometimes in remission, and always present. The sense of health and vibrancy is, at best, diminished, and at worst, lost,” wrote Jackson P. Rainer, Ph.D., a leading authority on grief and loss.

[Read more…]

My Disability May Be Invisible, But I’m Not

 

Hannah-Andrusky-Invisible-Disabilities-AssociationBut you don’t look sick.” “But you LOOK good.” “It’s all in your head.” “You just want attention.”

When most people are sick with the flu or a fever, they become pale and droopy and their hair is in a tussle. Therefore, when we meet someone who tells us he or she is ill or has an invisible disability, but he or she does not appear to be sick or in pain, we are often perplexed. Despite their appearance, we must realize that there is a difference between having a temporary cold or the flu and living day after day with a chronic illness or in chronic pain.

Many chronic conditions and disabilities are not as noticeable as a bad case of the flu. For instance, a person can battle symptoms such as extreme fatigue or cognitive impairments on the inside, even though he or she may appear healthy and well on the outside. Just the same, a person can have horrible pain or dizziness, despite the fact that he or she may seem strong and able.

[Read more…]

It’s Your Own Fault

Its-Your-Own-Fault-Illness-Pain

Have you ever heard the words, “Well, what do you expect?” when someone learns that a person is living with illness or pain caused by an injury from their job or hobby. Maybe that person’s job was full of risk, such as working in a gold mine as highlighted on the Discovery Channel’s show Gold Rush, or on a crab boat similar to Deadliest Catch.

Maybe they played sports and received multiple concussions and are impacted by the long-term effects or repeated head injuries. Former Colorado Avalanche hockey player Scott Parker knows this firsthand. According to Adrian Dater, a reporter for The Denver Post:

[Read more…]

You’re So Needy

You're So Needy - Illness and Pain“You could get better if you wanted to.” “You should just try harder.” “You’re being lazy.” “You need to be more motivated.” “You’re so needy.”

Have you ever heard any of these comments from friends and family members? Have you ever said one of these to someone living with illness or pain? Often when we come across someone who says he has been sick or in pain for a long time, we think he is either exaggerating or not doing something about it. After all, when most people get sick, they get some rest, take some medication and are soon back on their feet. So why can’t our loved ones do that, too?

[Read more…]

My Thoughts on Sharing Your Illness with Others

Alanna-Wong-Invisible-Disabilities

Alanna Wong

Everyone has a story to share – this is what connects us to one another, no matter our family background or where we come from. No matter what you’ve been through in your life, telling your story is the first step to creating meaningful relationships and building a strong support system.

People with invisible illnesses are often misunderstood, blamed, mistreated and judged. When we don’t acknowledge the truth of such illnesses, we are telling these people that they don’t matter or that they have no value. How will people heal if others don’t want to acknowledge that they have an illness in the first place? Society needs to understand invisible illnesses (many of which are neurological-affecting the brain and nervous system) are like any other condition that affects a different part of the body. Until this happens, people with invisible illness will continue to be stigmatized.

[Read more…]

About Alanna Wong

Alanna has spent the past seven years dedicating her life to raising awareness for Kleine-Levin Syndrome (KLS) in an effort to help other sufferers. Alanna’s focus has been to raise funds for research, engage and connect with the community, and facilitate the KLS Foundation website. Alanna is writing her KLS memoir. You can read a FREE introductory section of her book here: http://alannawonglife.com/real-life-sleeping-beauty/ Alanna has been featured in numerous media outlets including: Anderson Cooper, ITV London, Sunday Night (Australia), The Sun, The Daily Mail, and Seventeen Magazine (Singapore).

Truly Caring is Healthy

Truly-Caring-is-Healthy“Why did I decide to found the Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA)?” This question has been posed to me on many occasions. The obvious answer is because of my wife, Sherri. As you may know, Sherri lives daily with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic Lyme disease, chemical injury and traumatic brain injury, as well as severe pain and bone crushing fatigue. I met Sherri in 1992 at the age of 28 after she was officially diagnosed with MS and Lyme disease. I fell in love not only with her, but also with helping other people who are living with invisible disabilities and pain every day. I wanted to be her champion and theirs, too.

But why care at all? Caring means being a part of someone else’s mess. Caring means moving from “it’s all about me” to “maybe, it is about you, too”. According to Google, the word “care” is both a noun that means “the provision of what is necessary for the health, welfare, maintenance and protection of someone or something,” and a verb that means to “feel concern or interest; attach importance to something.” I think that one shows he cares via kindness in both senses of the word.

[Read more…]

Invisible Disabilities in the News with IDA Founder, Wayne Connell

IDA on Comcast Newsmakers

Comcast Newsmakers reporter, Beverly Weaver, interviews Invisible Disabilities Association Founder and President, Wayne Connell about invisible disabilities. This interview aired several times in September 2013.

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe.

Mrs. Washington Contestant Understands Invisible Disabilities

Rosie Lohr, Mrs. Washington Contestant

Rosie Lohr, Mrs. Washington Contestant

My name is Rosie Lohr. I am currently Mrs. Moses Lake and I am competing for Mrs. Washington, because it is my mission is to bring awareness to the public about invisible disabilities.

I chose the Invisible Disabilities Association as my platform and my charity, because I want to give people with invisible disabilities a voice in Washington state and other parts of America. I desire to help people understand that just because a disability may not be readily visible, they should not be denied what they need and questioned at every corner they turn. It hurts. It is not their fault and they deserve respect and not judgment.

Why am I passionate about this issue? On October 8, 1998 I received a phone call while at work that would change my life forever. The call was from my father who was at work at ASIMS, a chemical plant in Moses Lake WA. I took the call and my father said, “You need to sit down.” My first thought was that something must have happened to my four month old daughter; I began to shake. He told me there has been an explosion at the plant and I needed to get to the hospital now. Jeremy (my husband) had been injured.

[Read more…]

About

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit. IDA reaches out through our websites, projects, articles, pamphlets, booklet, social network, resources, videos, radio interviews, seminars, events and more! Get the word out! Share a link to our articles and pages with Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and through Email by clicking on the Share link. Leave a comment!

Matt Barrett Gets His Wish to Attend 2013 IDA Awards Banquet

Matt Barrett Speaking at the 2011 IDA Awards Banquet

Matt Barrett Speaking at the 2011 IDA Honor Awards Banquet

Meet Matt Barrett, a “Walking Miracle” in Denver on October 24th. Matt will be autographing his book, A View from the Street.

Matt Barrett has lived a life most could never imagine. Matt has battled 11 forms of cancer and four brain tumors since he was just two years old.

As if that were not enough, because his face and body are disfigured by over 1,700 major surgeries, strangers have called him a monster, children have hidden behind their mothers, and store managers have asked him to leave the premises.

It is such a travesty when people are quick to judge Matt from the outside, because they are certainly missing out on getting to know this amazing person.

Animals sense Matt's gentle spirit.

Animals sense Matt’s gentle spirit.

Despite a lifetime of fighting cancer, being homeless off and on for most of his adult life, and enduring excruciating pain on a daily basis, Matt remains a giving and loving soul. 

Ask anyone who knows Matt and they will tell you he is a “Gentle Giant.” At 6 foot 4, over 300 pounds with a love for others as big as he is, his nickname seems fitting.

People on the streets don’t have a clue what they are missing when they fail to talk with this man and give him the respect he deserves. Those who hear about Matt’s journey are not only amazed, but inspired to be more appreciative of what they have.

For decades, doctors have called Matt a “Walking Miracle!” He has lived many, many years beyond anyone’s expectations. This has allowed him to continue his purpose in making this world a better place.

In 2011, Matt received a standing ovation as a Special Guest Speaker at the Invisible Disabilities Association Awards Banquet where there was not a dry eye in the house. Today, Matt was named an IDA Ambassador!

Matt has had many other accomplishments:

Matt Barrett and Sherri Connell, wife of IDA Founder

Matt Barrett and Sherri Connell, wife of IDA Founder

Although Matt has beaten countless odds, Matt’s prognosis is not good. Many doctors have told him he only has a matter of months or just weeks.

Thanks to the people who have rallied together to raise the funds, Matt’s wish to travel back to Denver for the 2013 Invisible Disabilities Association Awards Banquet is coming true!

Meet Matt on Thursday October 24th at the Denver Marriott South in Lone Tree. Details and registration: www.ItsNotAnIllusion.com

Matt Speaking at the 2011 Invisible Disabilities Association Awards Banquet

RELATED STORIES:

IDA Ambassador, Matt Barrett

A Lifelong Journey with Special Guest, Matt Barrett

Matt Barrett Gets Wish to Come Back to Attend 2013 IDA Awards Banquet

Matt Barrett’s Website, A View from the Street 

Order Matt Barrett’s Poetry Book, A View from the Street

Lifelong Battle with Illness Claims Man’s Face, Family but Not His Spirit. Martha Kang. September 27, 2013.  Picked up by Associated Press – Man’s long struggle with cancer nears end. October 15, 2013.

Photographer Tells Matt’s Story

Celebrate Life Event for Matt Barrett. May 25, 3013. Seattle, Washington.

Homeless in Seattle – Has helped Matt make 2 trip wishes reality through their supporters

Tent City 3 – Where Matt lived for three years

 

About

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit. IDA reaches out through our websites, projects, articles, pamphlets, booklet, social network, resources, videos, radio interviews, seminars, events and more! Get the word out! Share a link to our articles and pages with Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and through Email by clicking on the Share link. Leave a comment!

Illusionists Illuminate Evening for People Living with Illness and Pain

Illusionists, David and Teesha Laflin

Illusionists, David and Teesha Laflin

Press Release

Colorado Illusionists Illuminate the Lives of People Living with Illness and Pain

Denver, CO – October 10, 2013. It’s Not An Illusion! Debilitating illness and pain is real, even though we can’t always “see” it.

Illusionists, David and Teesha Laflin will be making things “appear” in honor of millions of people living with various conditions becoming “Invisible No More” at the 2013 It’s Not An Illusion Awards Banquet on October 24, 2013 at the Denver Marriott South in Lone Tree.

Since 2002, internationally recognized illusionists, David and Teesha Laflin have entertained and inspired audiences through their creative blend of both classic and cutting-edge illusions. They have performed all across the United States and on five different continents. Their programs have been featured at numerous conferences and conventions throughout the world and have reached large-scale audiences through their television appearances. Last year they performed for the Women’s NCAA Final Four in Denver. In addition, David and Teesha are the creators of several illusion training DVD’s and the authors of the popular book “ILLUSIONS.”

The evening will highlight nine IDA Award Recipients who are incredible individuals and businesses making a difference for people living with disabilities. Also enjoy a Silent and LIVE Auction and a delicious dinner and dessert with Honorary Chairs, Adrienne Ruston Fitzgibbons and Jack Fitzgibbons and Emcee, Ed Greene, CBS4 Weather and News Anchor.

Join us and invite your friends, doctors and neighbors for a thrilling evening for a great cause!

The IDA Team

ABOUT THE INVISIBLE DISABILITIES ASSOCIATION

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) is a non-profit organization that has been encouraging, educating and connecting people and organizations touched by illness, injury and disabilities around the world since 1996. IDA provides awareness, articles, pamphlets, booklets, radio interviews, videos, seminars, events, resources, an online social network and much more.

Contact the IDA Team: Go to the Contact Page on the Invisible Disabilities Association website. Visit the Invisible Disabilities Association at: www.InvisibleDisabilities.org

About

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit. IDA reaches out through our websites, projects, articles, pamphlets, booklet, social network, resources, videos, radio interviews, seminars, events and more! Get the word out! Share a link to our articles and pages with Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and through Email by clicking on the Share link. Leave a comment!

Worldwide Outreach Awards Individuals and Organizations Making a Difference

Invisible Disabilities Association Honor Awards

Invisible Disabilities Association Honor Awards

Press Release

Worldwide Outreach Awards Individuals and Organizations Making a Difference

Denver, CO – October 10, 2013. The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) has been recognizing individuals and organizations making a difference in the lives of those living with illness, pain and disability since 2008.

Join IDA on October 24th at the Denver Marriott South to help recognize the following amazing people
with our2013 IDA Honor Awards:

 

  • Corporate Dave Liniger, Chairman and Co-founder – RE/MAX
  • Founders Paul Myhill – TrafficJam
  • Healthcare Marlo Thomas, Award Winning Actress and Author, National Outreach Director – St Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • Impact Kimberly McCleary, President and CEO -CFIDS Association of America
  • InspirationKevin Sorbo – Actor, Producer, Director and Author of True Strength
  • Invisible HeroJennifer Brusstar, President and CEO – Tug McGraw Foundation
  • Perseverance Laura Hillenbrand, New York Times Bestselling Author of Seabiscuit and Unbroken
  • Research John Kelley, Chair and CEO – CereScan
  • Volunteer Shery McDonald-Galbreath, Founder and President – SaddleUp! Foundation

Also experience exciting entertainment from Illusionists, David and Teesha Laflin. Meet our Emcee, Ed Greene, CBS4 Weather and News Anchor, as well as Honorary Chairs, Adrienne Ruston Fitzgibbons and Jack Fitzgibbons. Enjoy a Silent and LIVE Auction and a delicious dinner and dessert.

Truly and evening of inspiring stories, touching presentations and lighthearted fun bring awareness to invisible disabilities. Doctors, nurses, friends and family often walk away saying, “Wow! I didn’t get it until tonight!”

Be a sponsor or purchase individual seats. Everyone is welcome! Don’t forget to invite your co-workers and friends!

The IDA Team

ABOUT THE INVISIBLE DISABILITIES ASSOCIATION

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) is a non-profit organization that has been encouraging, educating and connecting people and organizations touched by invisible disabilities around the world since 1996. IDA provides awareness, articles, pamphlets, booklets, radio interviews, videos, seminars, events, resources, an online social network and much more.

Contact the IDA Team: Go to the Contact Page on the Invisible Disabilities Association website. Visit the Invisible Disabilities Association at: www.InvisibleDisabilities.org

About

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit. IDA reaches out through our websites, projects, articles, pamphlets, booklet, social network, resources, videos, radio interviews, seminars, events and more! Get the word out! Share a link to our articles and pages with Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and through Email by clicking on the Share link. Leave a comment!

IDA Founder and President Special Guest on Kidney Talk

Renal Support Network 2013Press Release

IDA Founder and President, Wayne Connell, was Special Guest on Kidney Talk!

Parker, CO – September 12, 2013. The Invisible Disabilities Association Founder and President, Wayne Connell was a Special Guest on Kidney Talk! on August 20, 2013.

He discussed living with invisible disabilities with Lori Hartwell of the Renal Support Network. He shared awareness, tips and insights for understanding and supporting people living with all types of debilitating conditions.

Listen to the interview online!

ABOUT THE INVISIBLE DISABILITIES ASSOCIATION

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) is a non-profit organization that has been encouraging, educating and connecting people and organizations touched by invisible disabilities around the world since 1996. IDA provides awareness, articles, pamphlets, booklets, radio interviews, videos, seminars, events, resources, an online social network and much more.

Contact the IDA Team: Go to the Contact Page on the Invisible Disabilities Association website. Visit the Invisible Disabilities Association at: www.InvisibleDisabilities.org

RESOURCE:

Renal Support Network

About

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit. IDA reaches out through our websites, projects, articles, pamphlets, booklet, social network, resources, videos, radio interviews, seminars, events and more! Get the word out! Share a link to our articles and pages with Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and through Email by clicking on the Share link. Leave a comment!

IDA President Speaking at The 12th Annual Twin Cities DI Day

Twin Cities DI Day 9-13-13Press Release

IDA President Speaking at The 12th Annual Twin Cities DI Day

Parker, CO – September 10, 2013. The Invisible Disabilities Association is thrilled to announce that our Founder and President, Wayne Connell will be a Special Guest Speaker for The 12th Annual Twin Cities DI Day on September 13, 2013.

The Twin Cities DI Day is recognized as the premier income protection education event in the nation!  Over 250 financial professionals come together each year to hear up to the minute information on the industry, get motivated to protect their clients and to be inspired by stories of real people facing and overcoming the challenges of disability.

Wayne will teach you the Language of Invisible Disabilities.

Wayne married his wife Sherri in 1994. Sherri was suffering from Primary Progressive MS and Late Stage Chronic Lyme Disease and many are surprised when they learn he asked Sherri to marry him anyway.  Wayne knew he wanted to spend the rest of his life with Sherri, even if it meant dealing with pain and suffering. This led to his having a heart for all who live with chronic illness and pain.

Wayne is now passionate about helping others who struggle with disabilities.   The Invisible Disabilities Association was born of his desire is to reach out and help bridge the gap of understanding and support.

ABOUT THE INVISIBLE DISABILITIES ASSOCIATION

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) is a non-profit organization that has been encouraging, educating and connecting people and organizations touched by invisible disabilities around the world since 1996. IDA provides awareness, articles, pamphlets, booklets, radio interviews, videos, seminars, events, resources, an online social network and much more.

Contact the IDA Team: Go to the Contact Page on the Invisible Disabilities Association website. Visit the Invisible Disabilities Association at: www.InvisibleDisabilities.org

*DI Day is Disability Insurance Day.

RESOURCE:

Twin Cities DI Day

About

The Invisible Disabilities Association (IDA) encourages, educates and connects people and organizations touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. Formerly known as The Invisible Disabilities Advocate, IDA was founded in 1997 and incorporated in 2004 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit. IDA reaches out through our websites, projects, articles, pamphlets, booklet, social network, resources, videos, radio interviews, seminars, events and more! Get the word out! Share a link to our articles and pages with Google Plus, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and through Email by clicking on the Share link. Leave a comment!

Don’t Be Afraid of Life’s Uncertainties

Doctor VisitThis past week Mike and I went to see my kidney doctor, as we do about every 4 months.  The purpose of the visit is to monitor my kidneys and how they are doing.  It’s always like sitting on pins and needles until he reads the numbers from the blood test, which tell you everything.  Fortunately, this past week the numbers were good.

I’ve been off dialysis now for almost three years.  My kidneys started functioning to the point where I did not need dialysis any more.   [Read more…]

About Angela Pierce

In 1985, Angela Pierce survived a 125-foot free fall while mountain climbing, breaking her bones in 168 places. Her story of survival is a miracle. The lessons she has learned over the last 27 years are an incredible inspiration to others who must climb their own mountains every day. Visit her website, Falling Off the Mountain.

We All Believe in Love

Kathe and David SkinnerWe  believe in love, we just don’t practice it.

Maybe because we think love has no limits, no boundaries, that all is fair.  Love conquers all and love never ends.  Besides time, love is the greatest healer.  And along with diamonds, love is forever.

If that’s true, what about the chart-topping occurrence of divorce?  It’s said that love never fails, but it does.  As for remarriage, those vows would have to be toned down to reflect this second-hand (or third or more) love.   But they’re not.

[Read more…]

About Kathe Skinner

Kathe Skinner is a Marriage & Family Therapist turned Relationship Coach in private practice. She conducts Couples Retreats in fabulous places, offers webinars and holds Couples Communication Classes along the Front Range of Colorado. She and her husband David live in Colorado Springs with two hooligan cats. She has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis for over 30 years.

Friendships Over Fragrances

Is-a-loved-missing-from-your-life

A couple of years ago, my wife, Sherri, said to me, “We need to go to San Diego for surgery.” Really? San Diego? Walks on the beach! Shamu! The zoo! It sounded like fun. OK, the surgery part didn’t – but we had not had a vacation in almost three years, and I could think of worse places to go in February. Maybe we could even make a stop and see Mickey Mouse.

Then, I remembered that we could not fly to San Diego. We would have to drive from Denver, two days out and two days back. Why would we have to drive? In addition to living daily with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Lyme disease, Sherri also suffers from a medical condition known as Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS). Airplanes and rental cars are out of the question. Our car is an older model car and is a safe place for us.

Finding a place to stay is also not an easy task. We needed to stop for one night on the way to California and one night on the way back. It usually takes about a month for me to prepare for a trip like this. Before we leave, I fill up the car and cargo carrier with all the necessities, including gas filtering air purifiers, UV mold killers, oxygen bottles, coolers for food, sheets, towels, pillows, sleeping bags and couch cushions (in case we have to sleep in the car). We call hotels in advance to have them clean the room with baking soda and vinegar. We almost did have to sleep in the car on the way back, because the hotel said they gave away our special room. Fortunately for us, they didn’t, although the room was barely tolerable with only two air purifiers on full tilt.

We wanted to spend three nights at Disneyland and three days in San Diego. Disney was amazing. They blocked off our room in advance and did their special allergy cleaning and even provided their own air purifier for the room. Disney also turned off the fragrance generator in the hotel lobby and permanently removed the air fresheners in each of the first aid station restrooms in their parks, not only at Disneyland, but at Walt Disney World as well. They did all of this because of their world class service and because of the educational material we provided them from the Cleaner Indoor Air Campaign.

Finally, we stayed in San Diego for the surgery and recovered at the home of our great friends, Karyn Buxman and Greg Godek. Karyn is a nurse, Hall of Fame speaker and the author of the “What’s So Funny About … ” series of health humor books. Greg is the best-selling author of 1,001 Ways to be Romantic. (You can read posts from Karyn and Greg on Disability.Blog.)

In order for us to stay at their home, Karyn and Greg had to change their laundry detergent to fragrance free a few months before our visit. A week before we arrived, they started to use fragrance-free soap, shampoo, hairspray and deodorant. They also sealed in bags and hid away any candles with fragrances. We felt very honored that they would not only host us in their home, but also think so much of us as friends that they would change some of their personal lifestyle habits and choices.

The trip turned out to be amazing, because Disney, as well as Karyn and Greg, chose Friendships over Fragrance. Most people have experienced or know someone who has difficulty breathing, nausea or headaches from things such as cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust, pesticides, cleaning agents or hanging out in the laundry detergent aisle for too long. Even so, when it comes to those who report moderate to severe adverse health effects from chemicals used in everyday items, such as perfumes, fragranced laundry and personal care products, friends and family are often perplexed.

However, millions report living with various Environmental Illnesses (EI), such as Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), Toxic Injury, Chemical Injury and/or Toxic Encephalopathy. In addition to the many people who have reported worsening of allergies, asthma and COPD, others particularly at risk include those battling illness or cancer, or living with Autism or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), as well as expectant mothers and babies.

Some of the symptoms reported range from mild to debilitating coughing, difficulty breathing, closing of the airways, sneezing, nausea, headaches, dizziness, weakness, numbness, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, pain, joint swelling, migraines, vertigo, fainting, behavioral and mood changes, depression, hormone dysfunctions, memory loss, cognitive dysfunctions, paralysis, seizures, swelling of the brain and more.

Surprisingly, issues with fragrances are not as rare and unusual as people may think. Research done in 2004, 2005 and 2009 by Stanley M. Caress and Anne C. Steinemann found that nearly 38 percent of Americans report adverse effects when exposed to a fragranced product. For instance, approximately 20 percent of Americans report breathing difficulties, headaches or other health problems when exposed to air fresheners and deodorizers, and more than 10 percent report adverse effects when exposed to laundry products vented outdoors. Percentages are nearly twice as high for people with asthma. With approximately 310 million people in America in 2010, that is almost 117 million Americans who have adverse effects to normal, everyday products.

It is suspected that many more may possibly live with these reactions, but do not make the connection between the fragrances and their symptoms. Therefore, it is hard to determine exactly how many more people are affected. In a 2010 study of 25 fragranced consumer products, researchers identified 133 different VOCs (volatile organic compounds). Of those 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under at least one law.

Just taking laundry products alone as an example, the University of Washington found that all but one of the chemicals found in these products are “regulated as a toxic/hazardous chemical” under 1-7 laws. They are also listed either as a recognized or suspected carcinogen, as well as a neuro, immuno, kidney, liver, blood, developmental, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive, endocrine, skin and/or sense organ toxicant. Therefore, we cannot be entirely sure what kind of havoc these chemicals and others in our environment are doing to our bodies, health, blood, organs, hormones, immune or nervous systems.

When making modifications for people living with EI, keep in mind that everyone is different. Some reactions are more severe than others; some limitations from work, stores, public places and events are more constricting than others; and some can tolerate a certain product, but not another. For example, Charlie may notice he gets moderate headaches and nausea for several hours when he is around cigarette smoke, diesel fumes or heavy perfumes, while Sara may report debilitating migraines, pain and fatigue for several days or more from the above, as well as fragranced items, such as laundry, soaps, shampoo and deodorants.

As we can imagine, people living with these conditions can experience minor to extreme limited access to public places, issues at work or inability to attend functions with friends and family. Regrettably, these barriers may lead to feelings of loneliness, isolation and abandonment when loved ones choose not to forgo the fragrance products that cause these problems. Therefore, if our loved ones are telling us they are getting debilitating migraines, dizziness or fatigue from our fragranced products, maybe we can consider simply omitting or switching them to a fragrance-free version so that our friends or family members may remain a part of our lives. Choose Friendships over Fragrances.

May is Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) Awareness Month in many states and cities across the nation. Learn more at about this topic at the Cleaner Indoor Air Campaign, check out the Friendship over Fragrances resources as well as the campaign’s downloadable posters, or watch this video for more information.

Wayne Connell, the founder and president of the Invisible Disabilities Association, established IDA in 1996 out of the desire to educate friends and family about his wife’s debilitating illness. Soon afterwards, people around the globe began sending emails sharing how IDA had changed their relationships with their loved ones. He is co-author of the booklet, “But You LOOK Good, How to Encourage and Understand People Living with Illness and Pain.” Wayne’s background fueled his passion for helping people living with illness, pain and disability. His experience includes that of a professional, multitasking husband and caregiver with an extensive background in management, media and technology. This man on a mission quickly launched IDA into a worldwide outreach organization for millions of people living with invisible disabilities.

Make sure you check out IDA’s website for additional resources and stories at www.InvisibleDisabilities.org. Share your personal video story with us at www.InvisibleNoMore.tv. You can also be part of other people’s stories by joining them at www.Facebook.com/invisibledisabilities or becoming a member on www.InvisibleDisabilitiesCommunity.org.

This article was first published on Disability.Blog, by Disability.Gov on April 29, 2013.

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My First TV Interview

Angela Pierce TV InterviewRecently, I was a guest on a local TV program hosted by Scott Kaplan and Amber Mesker.  It was the first time I had ever been interviewed.  I did not realize how simple the set up was, as I expected to see a lot more cameras, lights and noise.  It was a simple set and very quiet.

I was asked to come on and tell my story about my accident.  When the interview began, I thought it would be about how to motivate people via my story, but instead it was an account of what actually happened.  I took a moment in my mind to figure out how to bring motivation to the story, so I referenced the moment when I was put in the ambulance and told Scott and Amber that my thoughts were centered on survival.  Instead of laying in a hospital, I’ll be laying in the sun and enjoying the weather.

The way I thought I could motivate people was to tell them that the most important thing when facing tragedy was to tell yourself, “don’t give up.  You’ll have your day in the sun if you hold on to life.”  After almost thirty years, I still tell myself that same message and find it to be very helpful to me as new challenges and struggles surface.

In conclusion, here’s the message for you, the readers:  When difficulty or tragedy strikes, realize that there are many different ways you can respond.  The most important thing to remember is that you can tell yourself is that it will be OK.  The moment won’t last forever.  You are worth more than the price of the trauma!

RESOURCE

U-T San Diego – Front Page with Scott & Amber. Watch Angela’s interview. January 14, 2013.

About Angela Pierce

In 1985, Angela Pierce survived a 125-foot free fall while mountain climbing, breaking her bones in 168 places. Her story of survival is a miracle. The lessons she has learned over the last 27 years are an incredible inspiration to others who must climb their own mountains every day. Visit her website, Falling Off the Mountain.

The Visible Invisible Disability

Wayne-Connell-and-Matt-Barrett-2011By Wayne Connell, Founder and President of the Invisible Disabilities Association 

What is a disability? In general, the term disability is often used to describe a physical or mental challenge. This could be a bump in life that can be managed, or a mountain that creates serious changes and loss.  Either way, this term should not be used to describe a person as weaker or lesser than anyone else!

Every person has a purpose, special uniqueness and value, no matter what hurdles they may face.  Just because a person has a disability, that does not mean they are “disabled. “ Many living with physical or mental challenges are still active in their work, sports or hobbies. Some with disabilities are able to work full or part time, but may struggle to get through their day, with little or no energy for other things. On the other hand, others may be unable to maintain gainful or substantial employment due to their disability, have trouble with daily living activities and need assistance with their care.

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), an individual with a disability is a person who:  Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment or is regarded as having such an impairment.

Furthermore, “A person is considered to have a disability if he or she has difficulty performing certain functions such as seeing, hearing, talking, walking, climbing stairs and lifting and carrying, or has difficulty performing activities of daily living, or has difficulty with certain social roles such as doing school work for children, working at a job and around the house for adults.” Statistics show that disabilities affect one-fifth of all Americans.

Often people think the term disability only refers to people who use a wheelchair or walker. On the contrary, the 1994-1995 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) found that 26 million Americans (almost 1 in 10) were considered to have a severe disability, while only 1.8 million used a wheelchair and 5.2 million used a cane, crutches or walker (Americans with Disabilities 94-95). In other words, 74 percent of Americans who live with a severe disability do not use such devices. Therefore, a disability cannot be determined solely on whether or not a person uses assistive equipment.

The term invisible disabilities refers to symptoms such as debilitating pain, fatigue, dizziness, weakness, cognitive dysfunctions, learning differences and mental disorders, as well as hearing and vision impairments. These are not always obvious to the onlooker, but can sometimes or always limit daily activities, range from mild challenges to severe limitations and vary from person to person.

In addition, someone who has a visible impairment or uses an assistive device, such as a wheelchair, walker or cane, can also have invisible disabilities. Whether or not a person uses an assistive device, if they are debilitated by symptoms like those described above, they live with invisible disabilities.

My friend Matt Barrett is a real example of someone living with visible invisible disabilities. Matt is 46-years-old and has battled 11 types of cancer since the age of two, including basal cell nevus syndrome, a genetic form of cancer passed down through his family for six generations. He has had over 1,700 surgeries and has lived with unbearable pain and fatigue for decades.

Matt has also been homeless off and on for much of his adult life. Matt is originally from Grand Junction, Colorado and has also lived in Portland, under a bridge in Los Angeles and in what is called “The Hole” in Seattle. Until a year ago September, he lived for three years in a tent in Tent City 3 in Seattle. He has written a book of poetry about being homeless and a blog, both called A View from the Street.

In addition to the battle of illness and being without a home, Matt has also lived with discrimination that most of us cannot fathom. Due to the surgeries Matt has had on his face, he has endured stares, dirty looks and has even has been asked to leave retail stores because he was “scaring” someone’s child.

You would think after a life of being treated this way, that Matt would be a bitter and angry person. However, those who take the time to get to know him find that he is a very kind, loving and giving man. What’s more, they are inspired and their lives are deeply enriched.

In 2011, freelance photographer Ilona Berzups was so moved by Matt’s story that she embarked on a photo essay project called, “Walking with Giant – One man’s battle with homelessness and debilitating illness.” (Matt’s nicknames are “Gentle Giant” and “Bear” because at 6’ 5”, he towers over most people.)

Also in 2011, Matt was determined to travel to Colorado to attend the Invisible Disabilities Association’s Awards Banquet and to spend time with a fellow high school classmate – my wife, Sherri.  Matt has wanted to attend for many years. After getting more bad news from his doctors about the tumors in his brain, he almost canceled. However, once you know Matt, you know that nothing was going to stop him from coming to Colorado. (He attended this past October for a second year as well).

When we found out Matt would be joining us in person, we immediately re-arranged the evening’s schedule and invited him to be a surprise Special Guest Speaker. Karyn Buxman, IDA Advisory Board member, National Hall of Fame speaker and nurse, gave a brief introduction as Matt approached the stage. Just a small glimpse into his life drove the attendees to their feet when he stepped up to the podium.

Matt briefly shared about his journey and appreciation for IDA’s compassion, awareness and support for him and for others. There was not a dry eye in the house, as lives were changed by Matt’s incredible lifelong story of perseverance in the midst of incredible hardship and pain.

By sharing Matt’s journey, our hope is that his struggles, pain and sheer courage will help us all to look beyond our preconceptions. Let’s not judge others by the way they look on the outside. Instead, let’s give love to one another and find out what they have been through, what they need and who they are on the inside.

Unfortunately, people often do judge others by what they see and jump to conclusions about what they can or cannot do. This can be equally frustrating for those who may appear unable, but are perfectly capable, and those who appear able, but are not.

The bottom line is that everyone with a disability is different – sometimes visibly, sometimes invisibly and sometimes both. They have varying challenges and needs, as well as abilities and attributes. Thus, we all should learn to listen with our ears, instead of judging with our eyes. Let’s learn to envision a world where people living with illness, pain and disability will be Invisible No More! 2013 here we come!

This article was first published on Disability.Blog by Disability.gov. December 21, 2012.

MORE IDA ARTICLES PUBLISHED ON DISABILITY.BLOG:

A Love That’s Unbroken

Being Truly Thankful

But You LOOK Good! on Disability.gov

Don’t Judge by Appearances

Friendships Over Fragrances

IDA Makes the “Top 10 Guest blogs of 2012″ on Disability.gov

Invisible No More!

It’s All in Your Head

Join the Expedition

Learning the Language of Invisible Disabilities

Looks Can Be Deceiving

The Visible Invisible Disability

What’s So Funny About …

 

MORE ABOUT MATT BARRETT:

A View from the Street. Blog by Matt Barrett

More Articles About Matt on IDA

Walking with Giant. Photo Essay by Ilona Berzups